CSR at Boskalis goes beyond managing our business and projects in a responsible manner. We seek to leverage our ability to influence and innovate, to create added social, environmental and economic value where we can. These cases illustrate our approach in action.

Overview CSR cases

Griend nature preservation project

Brief Boskalis teamed up with the Dutch Society for the Preservation of Nature (Natuurmonumenten) to protect the uninhabited island of Griend in the Dutch Wadden Sea. The island provides a vital habitat for hundreds of thousands of migratory and breeding birds. However, due to erosion this bird paradise was at risk of being washed away. Challenge Natuurmonumenten awarded Boskalis this project mainly because of all the measures it proposed to minimize any disruption of nature. The work continued day and night, with Boskalis using green light on the island at night to protect nature. In order not to disturb the migratory birds, the project started after the nesting season and was suspended during the spring tides. Solution Boskalis used sand extracted during the maintenance of shipping channels to create a 400-meter wide foreshore that will protect Griend from erosion in the decades to come. The island’s natural protection consists of a barrier of shells, plant debris and sand with a salt marsh on the lee side. The new shore includes shellfish banks, consistent with the natural situation on Griend. To make Griend more appealing for nesting birds, the topsoil was removed in some parts of the island. Terns and common terns have a preference for barren and sparsely vegetated locations and the higher parts of Griend were very much overrun with vegetation. Boskalis used the topsoil that was removed for the new shore. In addition, a small opening was created in the dike on the northern side, allowing the seawater to flow into the salt marsh at high tide and deposit clay, thus naturally raising the level of the salt marsh. Project impression Share this Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google+ E-mail Print

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Contributing to the circular economy

Brief In 2016 Boskalis and HVC, the largest non-commercial waste collection company in the Netherlands, opened the world’s first bottom ash washing plant. The plant recycles incinerator bottom ash, a by-product of the incineration of household waste in waste-to-energy plants. Challenge The Netherlands has twelve waste-to-energy plants and they produce approximately two million tons of bottom ash annually. For many years this contaminated bottom ash could only be used as a building material in the Netherlands if stringent conditions were met, with the material having to be sealed in sheeting to prevent pollutants leaking into the environment. However, the use of incinerator bottom ash required such an intensive and expensive management program by the Dutch government that it will be banned. Solution Boskalis Environmental developed its own patented separation and flushing technology and offers a unique sustainable method of cleaning incinerator bottom ash. Once processed, almost all of the bottom ash is suitable for re-use as a raw material, allowing Boskalis to contribute to the circular economy. The mineral fraction, consisting of sand and granulate, will be used as a freely applicable building material in Boskalis’ civil engineering works while the valuable and rare metals can be marketed as commodities by the waste-to-energy plants. Haico Wevers, director of Boskalis Environmental At the beginning of 2017 Boskalis announced, together with Inashco, that it will process all bottom ash produced by Attero’s waste-to-energy plants in the Netherlands for a period of ten years. A new state-of-the-art plant at Nauerna in the Port of Amsterdam area will process the bottom ash. More about CSR Creating long-term value Boskalis’ principal strategic objective is aimed at a healthy balance between long-term profitability and our social and environmental responsibility. Read more Impact on the environment Boskalis provides sustainable solutions for ports, offshore energy and infrastructure markets. Read more CSR report 2016 Boskalis has been reporting on its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategy, performance and results in a separate annual report since 2009. Read more Also of interest Press release Boskalis joint venture awarded bottom ash processing contract by Attero Papendrecht, 2 February 2017 Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V. (Boskalis) announces, together with Inashco, that it will process all bottom ash produced by Attero for a period of ten years. The contract was awarded to ACCN (Ash Cleaning Company Netherlands), a joint venture between Boskalis Environme View more Share this Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google+ E-mail Print

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Calling a halt to coastal erosion

Brief Boskalis, as one of the partners in the EcoShape consortium, has embarked on a five-year Building with Nature project to halt coastal erosion in Central Java. Through a unique integration of mangrove restoration, small-scale engineering and sustainable land use the project is expected to turn the tide. Challenge With some 70,000 residents in the Demak district in Indonesia, urgent action was needed as the coastline has been retreating at an alarming rate, with the sea already having taken more than three kilometers of land in some places. Mangrove forests that can help dampen waves and stabilize sediment have been chopped down for aquaculture development. There is also significant subsidence as a result of the extraction of fresh water, making the impact of rising sea levels even worse. Solution Inspired by how the Netherlands used to reclaim land centuries ago by constructing permeable dams made from willows a similar approach is used in Java. Villagers hammer bamboo poles at least two meters into the seabed and use bundles of brushwood from the shore, binding them together to form dams of about 100 meters long. The dams dampen the waves and take the energy out of the water, while the sediment can still filter through and accumulate and settle behind the dams. In just one year, the level of the bed can rise by up to 50 centimeters. However, it is not enough to provide a technical solution in Demak; there are many ecological and socio-economic issues to be addressed through the program. With the help of Wetlands International and Blue Forests as well as local and national government agencies Coastal Field Schools have been set up to train villagers so that they can identify and develop successful aquaculture practices and care for the mangroves they depend on for coastal safety and water purification. Looking at the equator, a similar approach could be taken in countries with comparable vulnerable coastlines such as Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, Bangladesh, India, as well as countries in Africa and Central America. It is a low-tech solution but requires high-tech knowledge and expertise. In many locations it is not ecologically and economically feasible to implement hard infrastructure solutions, such as dams or dikes. Instead, this approach is cost-effective and brings multiple benefits to various stakeholders by restoring ecosystem services along muddy coasts across the tropics. Social engineering consistent with Boskalis tradition We want to approach the social impact of our projects in a decent and responsible way, taking into account the international rules Read more in this interview with CEO Berdowski More about CSR Building with Nature Boskalis proactively developed Building with Nature to gain insight into the impact of hydraulic engineering projects on ecosystems. Read more Impact on local communities Boskalis promotes prosperity, invests in local communities and prevents and mitigates adverse impacts as part of its corporate social responsibility strategy. Read more CSR report 2016 Boskalis has been reporting on its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategy, performance and results in a separate annual report since 2009. Read more Learn more Corporate social responsibility Asia Coastal defense Building with Nature Share this Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google+ E-mail Print

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Marker Wadden

Brief In March 2016, Boskalis started work on the first stage of one of the largest nature restoration projects in western Europe - Marker Wadden. The project will transform the ecologically impoverished Markermeer lake into a dynamic area rich in animal and plant life, through the creation of nature islands using sand, clay and fine sediment. Building with Nature techniques play a key role in the project. Challenge The challenge is to rebalance the ecology of the Markermeer and to develop a sustainable future for the lake by developing a high-quality nature area. The lake was created in 1976 when the Houtrib dike between Enkhuizen and Lelystad was completed. The dike had a major impact on the underwater environment of the lake. Fine sediment that was previously carried away by the current to Lake IJsselmeer fell to the bottom of Lake Markermeer where it settled like a blanket, making the water of the lake turbid. As a result fish and bird populations declined dramatically over the last decades. Solution One innovation being introduced into the project is building with fine sediment, under the innovative Building with Nature research program initiated by Boskalis (see link below). Fine sediment is too soft to build an island. This will be resolved by building ring dikes of sand to contain the sediment. The Marker Wadden project is a Building with Nature project par excellence. The landscape and the ecology have been given top priority from the very start. Together with the client, the Dutch Society for the Preservation of Nature (Natuurmonumenten) we developed a project approach, that was based on the question of what provisions were needed to create a healthy habitat for plants and wildlife. Once that had been established it was then up to us, in our role of hydraulic engineer, to realize the plans. The interaction between the various parties to coordinate the wishes and practical possibilities culminated in this groundbreaking design. Hendrik Postma, Director, Boskalis Nederland   Stage 1 of this project involves the creation of the first large island, and a marshland with vegetation, shallow ponds, creeks and channels. Boskalis will construct a new area of around 300 hectares, both above and below the waterline. To protect it from storms we will construct beaches, sand banks and low dunes, linked by a rock dam. We will provide for gradual transitions from land to water, as well as creating various levels under water. This will allow the sediment to settle in shallow areas and creeks, thus creating a natural water purification system. In addition, a special trench will be constructed to collect the fine sediment from Lake Markermeer. This ‘sediment trap’ will make the turbid water clear again. The captured sediment will be used to construct more islands in the future. Construction of Marker Wadden Building with Nature par excellence The Marker Wadden is one of the largest nature restoration projects in Western Europe. In our Creating New HORIZONS magazine we explain how this project will transform the ecologically impoverished Markermeer lake into a flourishing area. Read more Video impression Watch the video about this remarkable project that will transform the map of the Netherlands. More about CSR Building with Nature Boskalis proactively developed Building with Nature to gain insight into the impact of hydraulic engineering projects on ecosystems. Read more Impact on the environment Boskalis provides sustainable solutions for ports, offshore energy and infrastructure markets. Read more CSR report 2016 Boskalis has been reporting on its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategy, performance and results in a separate annual report since 2009. Read more Also of interest Project Construction of Marker Wadden Boskalis has been awarded the first phase of the Marker Wadden development in the Netherlands. The project includes the construction of an island with underwater landscaping. The Marker Wadden are natural islands that will be developed in the Markermeer lake in the years to come. They will provide a View more Press release Boskalis constructs Marker Wadden island Papendrecht, 14 September 2015 Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V. has been awarded the first phase of the Marker Wadden development in The Netherlands by the Department of Public Works (Rijkswaterstaat). The project scope includes the construction of an island with underwater landscaping. The contract View more Share this Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google+ E-mail Print

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3D printed reefs

Brief Boskalis will create and install six artificial reef modules at the Larvotto reserve in Monaco in 2016, as part of a 3D reef pilot project with Prince Albert II of Monaco’s foundation and the Monaco Larvotto Reserve. The reefs, consisting of sand, will be constructed using a 3D printer. They will be used to improve the ecology and the quality of the seawater at the reserve.  Challenge The pilot project is being supervised by an international team of marine scientists who have researched topics including the foundations and reef geometry best suited to the development of marine life in the Larvotto reserve. All characteristics are to be incorporated into a single 3D design. Boskalis is coordinating the design and production, and will also be responsible for transporting the reefs to Monaco and installing them. The installation will be followed by extensive monitoring in order to compare the ecological development of the printed units with more traditional artificial reef units within the reserve. All parties involved view this as a unique opportunity to contribute to a new vision on artificial reef development. If the pilot is successful, it could make an important contribution to boosting biodiversity and building or restoring ecosystems around the world. Solution Dolomite sand in combination with a marine-safe binding agent will be used to make the artificial reef units. Six reef units will be printed in Italy, using a D-Shape printer. Each unit will have an outer dimension of 2 meters in diameter and 1 meter in height, and at a glance resembles a mushroom. Each unit will weigh approximately 2.5 tons when dry. The reef units will then be transported by truck from Italy to the loading port, Port Hercules in Monaco, and installed by a professional dive team, well experienced in artificial reef installation at the Larvotto Reserve. The dive team will buoy the units, which are resting in their steel transport cage, using balloons. Then the units will be towed by boat to their final locations, where the balloons will be deflated to lower the units gently to the seabed. Once safely placed, a team of divers will remove the protective transport cages. Highlight At Boskalis, we are always looking for ways to embed our commitment to sustainability into the concrete projects we implement around the world. This starts with our employees, who develop innovative ideas on a daily basis. We recently set out to spread the word internally about our sustainability initiatives and gather employee feedback on how we make CSR-related decisions. Read more in our CSR report More about CSR Building with Nature Boskalis proactively developed Building with Nature to gain insight into the impact of hydraulic engineering projects on ecosystems. Read more Large scale transplant of coral Boskalis worked with specialist teams to move 150,000 individual pieces of coral in Jamaica. Read more Impact on the environment Boskalis provides sustainable solutions for ports, offshore energy and infrastructure markets. Read more CSR report 2016 Boskalis has been reporting on its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategy, performance and results in a separate annual report since 2009. Read more Share this Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google+ E-mail Print

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Biofuel pilot program

Brief In 2015, Boskalis, along with consortium partners GoodFuels Marine of the Netherlands and Finnish engine manufacturer Wärtsilä, launched a two-year biofuel pilot program aimed at accelerating the scalable development of sustainable, reliable and affordable drop-in biofuels for the maritime sector, which could result in significant emissions reductions. Challenge With a fleet of around 1,000 units Boskalis is constantly on the lookout for ways to reduce emissions and innovate in terms of sustainability. Boskalis operates globally and our ships do not have fixed, regular ports of call. They are often deployed for relatively long periods to remote locations with limited infrastructure. “We are strongly committed to developing business models based around sustainability. If our business objectives go hand-in-hand with sustainability and things such as technical feasibility and scalability are also in order, there is a huge potential for broad acceptance of this biofuel initiative. It could result in really significant reductions in emissions.” Theo Baartmans, Boskalis Board of Management   Solution Consortium partners are looking at blending diesel with biofuels up to a ratio of 30% or even 70%. There are both operational and financial considerations that make drop-in biofuels attractive. From a financial point of view, the advantage is that unlike LNG, drop-in biofuels require no expensive modifications to the ships. A drop-in biofuel gives Boskalis the flexibility to bunker this fuel when it is available. Testing of the various new biofuels at the Wärtsilä laboratory in Finland was completed in late 2015. In 2016, endurance testing will start on one Boskalis vessel in order to validate the long-term performance and possible impact on the diesel engine, lubricant and fuel feed system, after which the fuel will undergo further testing on several Boskalis ships. More about CSR Boskalis launches biofuel pilot program The maritime sector is missing out on an opportunity to utilize what could be an easy-to-use and truly sustainable fuel – drop-in biofuels. Boskalis is part of a consortium working to change this. Read more Impact on the environment Boskalis provides sustainable solutions for ports, offshore energy and infrastructure markets. Read more Greater sustainability in the chain With our suppliers we conduct research into feasibility of cleaner and more efficient fuels. Read more CSR report 2016 Boskalis has been reporting on its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategy, performance and results in a separate annual report since 2009. Read more Also of interest News Boskalis launches sustainable drop-in marine bio-fuels pilot Boskalis today announced their collaboration with GoodFuels and Wärtsilä in a two-year pilot program to accelerate the development of truly sustainable, scalable and affordable marine bio-fuels. Bio-fuels today are not part of the marine fuel mix that operators and owners can choose from. This m View more News First tug in the port of Rotterdam fuelled with GTL The Boskalis vessel the SMIT Elbe in the port of Rotterdam has become the first tugboat in the Netherlands to be fuelled with Shell GTL. GTL, which stands for gas-to-liquids, is a liquid fuel made from natural gas converted into synthetic diesel. GTL produces far fewer nitrogen oxide, sulphur dioxi View more News Boskalis forms sustainable fuel partnership with SkyNRG Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V. (Boskalis) has reached an agreement with SkyNRG for a delivery of 250,000 liters of sustainable diesel, which is sourced from used cooking oil and blended with 70% conventional diesel. The biodiesel will be used in a pilot in the Netherlands involving a number of Bosk View more Share this Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google+ E-mail Print

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